Speakers at an upcoming Churchill Fellowship event include Byron Bay artist John Dahlsen, who received a Fellowship in 2014 so he could work with master artists in Japan and Netherlands, using elite woodblock and other printing methods.
Speakers at an upcoming Churchill Fellowship event include Byron Bay artist John Dahlsen, who received a Fellowship in 2014 so he could work with master artists in Japan and Netherlands, using elite woodblock and other printing methods.

Artist to inspire Fellowship hopefuls at info session

The organisation behind Churchill Fellowships will visit Byron Bay next week to encourage residents to apply.

The awards are open to people from all walks of life who hope to travel overseas to explore a passion.

You don’t need to have formal qualifications to apply and the award can send you anywhere in the world to visit experts in your chosen field.

More than 100 Churchill Fellowships are awarded in Australia each year.

The Yulgilbar Foundation is sponsoring a specific award that will go to someone with a rural background from the Northern Rivers region.

The aim is for them to undertake an innovative project relating to the environment and conservation.

Residents across all sectors have been encouraged to attend the upcoming events in Byron Bay and Grafton.

The events will offer valuable advice about developing project ideas and putting together an application.

“We encourage anyone who thinks they might have an idea for a project in any field to come along,” Winston Churchill Memorial Trust chief executive Adam Davey said.

“Everyone has the potential to become a Churchill Fellow – the only prerequisites are passion and curiosity and a willingness to step outside your comfort zone.

“Unlike more traditional academic fellowships, they are not given for tertiary study. No academic qualifications are required to apply.”

As a Churchill Fellow, you will have the opportunity to design your own projects to access expertise that can’t be found in Australia.

The Trust covers travel costs and living expenses for four to eight weeks, with fellowships worth an average of $29,000 each.

“Aside from their monetary value, the fellowships open doors to expertise and experiences often unavailable to independent travellers because the award is so widely recognised internationally,” Mr Davey said.

“Then when they return home, Churchill Fellows are encouraged and supported to inspire change at a local level, by applying, adapting and sharing what they have learnt.”

He said the Yulgilbar Foundation’s support meant the Trust could enhance its ongoing commitment to encouraging more rural and regional Australians to apply for the award.

Named after a historic station on the Clarence River, the foundation was established by Sarah and Baillieu Myer in 2001 to fund research that benefits rural, regional and remote Australia and, more specifically, education, environment, capacity-building and Alzheimer’s research.

Churchill Fellowship information sessions will be hosted by Mr Davey and Churchill Fellows Association of NSW president Ian Krimmer, while Churchill Fellows will be there to talk about their inspiring experiences.

One of the speakers at Byron Bay will be local environmental artist John Dahlsen, who received a fellowship in 2014 to allow him to work with master artists in Japan and the Netherlands using elite woodblock and other printing methods.

The local event will be held at Elements of Byron Bay from 5.30pm on Monday, March 9. The session is free but bookings are essential.

For more information about Churchill Fellowships and to register for an event visit www.churchillfellowships.com.au.

Applications can be made online until April 30 for travel between February 1, 2021 and January 31, 2022.